POZ Review: The Dear Hunter – Migrant

The Dear Hunter’s new album, Migrant, simply takes your breath away.

The album sets itself apart from The Dear Hunter’s previous three full-lengths all in sound, technique, and concept. No song in particular stands out, as they are all impressive by their own means. Setting that aside, everything about Migrant—from the instrumentation to the song writing—is subtle, but impactful. The songs are theatrical, enticing movement in an emotional and physical sense.

Every song on Migrant sounds different, but all of the tracks work in sync together. There’s pop, rock, and a pinch of folk to keep all types of listeners tuned in. At first, “Bring You Down” sounds like a sinister medley from a Hitchcock film, but then transitions into something much more comforting. The call-and-response between the chimes and the piano are mesmerizing. Add in Casey Crescenzo’s compelling voice, and the musical magic plays on.

“Shame” has the unsettling factor again, but feels like an elegant tango between quarrelling lovers. But then “An Escape” follows, which literally feels like an escape to another musical realm with gorgeous melodies dripping from every word. (For some reason, the arrangement of “oohs” midway through reminds me of the enchanting snow scene from “Edward Scissorhands.”) This is a song to blast in the car with the windows down as you speed down the highway en route to a spontaneous adventure.

Despite all of these beautiful elements, it’s almost like there’s a dark fog immersing itself over every track on Migrant. “The Kiss Of Life” marks the kiss of death on the album as it reaches its peak immediately before the remaining half. Crescenzo’s voice gets lost in an orchestra of instruments, proving that even the most beautiful things have flaws.

The Dear Hunter has created quite the buzz with this album, but Migrant will make new and old listeners aimlessly wander towards their sweet music like bees in a trap.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s